Newbie Questions

General trout, fishing, conservation, or anything outdoors related discussion. Trip reports and stream conditions welcome, but please do not name streams.
POLITICAL FREE ZONE
User avatar
SubtleSip
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 2:45 pm

Newbie Questions

Post by SubtleSip » Wed Jun 12, 2013 10:22 am

Hi Everyone,

Relatively new to the area and to Flyfishing. Thanks for all of your posts, very encouraging as I start to learn more and more about Flyfishing the driftless are for trout. Are their any websites you would recommend or charts that can help me identify haches and/or whats hiding under rocks? I can identify the basics...I think :). Any help is appreciated,

Peace,
"The search for fish is really a search for a grail: the place of perfect companionship and flawless contentment."

User avatar
TFO5wt
Posts: 758
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2011 8:33 pm
Location: Minneapolis

Post by TFO5wt » Wed Jun 12, 2013 12:00 pm

Simply put, people fish because it's fun

alvollmer
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Mar 08, 2013 12:23 pm

Re: Newbie Questions

Post by alvollmer » Wed Jun 12, 2013 4:06 pm

Seriously, our DNR webpage is world class compared to other states. I will happily pay an extra $3 for all of the features available to trout fisherpeople.

jrs
Posts: 1115
Joined: Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:22 am

Re: Newbie Questions

Post by jrs » Wed Jun 12, 2013 6:24 pm

alvollmer wrote:Seriously, our DNR webpage is world class compared to other states. I will happily pay an extra $3 for all of the features available to trout fisherpeople.
I agree. Our DNR does a great job with trout management, information for anglers, and securing easements. The easement book is another DNR "freebie" that is worth a few bucks to any serious trout angler.

As for newbie resources, the DNR hatch chart that TFO referenced is a great start. I really like Ross Mueller's books (http://www.amazon.com/Ross-A.-Mueller/e ... 794&sr=8-1) for driftless area hatch / fishing information. This board is also a good resource for local hatch info. Some one will usually post here about current hatches and there are folks that will help identify bugs if you post a picture or description. http://www.winonaflyfactory.com/ is also worth mentioning as he takes some excellent bug photos.

User avatar
SubtleSip
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 2:45 pm

Re: Newbie Questions

Post by SubtleSip » Thu Jun 13, 2013 8:35 am

Sweet. Thanks everyone! I really appreciate the help. I typically check out WFF once a week for updates, it's a very well done page. I will post some pictures of stuff I have seen as soon as I get it off of my camera.

Peace
"The search for fish is really a search for a grail: the place of perfect companionship and flawless contentment."

User avatar
SubtleSip
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 2:45 pm

Post by SubtleSip » Thu Jun 13, 2013 8:41 am

I was also really eager to find some Morels but I am assuming I am a bit late for that from what I hear?
"The search for fish is really a search for a grail: the place of perfect companionship and flawless contentment."

brntrout
Posts: 2945
Joined: Tue Apr 05, 2011 8:26 am

Post by brntrout » Thu Jun 13, 2013 8:51 am

I would guess morels are probably either done or at the very end by now.

brntrout
Posts: 2945
Joined: Tue Apr 05, 2011 8:26 am

Post by brntrout » Thu Jun 13, 2013 10:38 am

Subtlesip,

Here is a list of different mayflies that can provide good fishing on SE MN streams. If choose to fish these different species of mayfly hatches you will have to put your time in trying to find them because not all the species are on all our streams. In some cases some of the species may only be on a handful of streams or so that provide enough abundance of individuals to fish over.

Baetis vagans and there may be a few other baetis species as well they range in hook sizes 16 to 22. most of our streams still have baetis hatches. Common name for the species is Blue Wing Olive /BWO's

Ephemerella subvaria Common name Dark Hendrickson, hook size 12 & 14. This species can provide good fishing. However, only a handful of streams or so have decent numbers of this insect to provide good fishing.

Ephemerella invaria & rotunda Common name Light Hendrickson's, hook size 14 & 16 These two species were at one time the premier hatch in SE MN on most of our streams. Now days they are only found in good fish-able numbers on dozen streams of so. Tip, the rotunda species is size 14 and the invariaspecies is a size 16. Both species look almost identical in appearance other than their size difference.

Ephemerella dorothea Common name "The Sulphur Hatch" there is only one true sulphur hatch this is the originalspecies responsible for coining the frase "Sulphur Hatch". Hook size 16 & 18. At one time this species was fairly prolific and more wide spread in SE MN. Now days there may be less than a handful of stream that might have this species and the abundance of these insects on those streams may not provide good fishing any more.

Paraleptophebia adoptiva and possibly P. mollis Common name Blue Quill. Hook size 16. I believe a fair number streams still have these two species. At times they provide fair fishing but generally they are not long lasting or heavy in abundance when the do emerge.

Stenonema Vicarium Common name March Brown. Hook size 10. A fair number of streams have this hatch but only a handful or so provide good fishing. On the streams that do provide good fishing for this hatch emergence of these insects can be very heavy at times at times. However, the same streams at times can have inconsistent hatches of this insect as well.

Tricorythodes (might be more than one species in our waters) Common name "The Trico Hatch" Hook sizes 22, 24 & 26. This species can provide very good fishing on certain streams. In general this species is limited to slightly warmer rivers and streams. That means the number streams that have it are not many in number. On the streams that do have this hatch the emergence of trico can be heavy and last a few hours or more sometimes. This hatch also can last more than month long in certain years with the right weather conditions being present for the period.

Pseudocloeon (might be more than one species) Common name Pale Olives. Hook sizes 20, 22 & 24. This hatch used to be very prolific on many of our streams and could last a month or more. Unfortunatey I haven't seen thishatch on any streams i Have fished in years. However, that doesn't mean it not still present somewhere in SE MN . If this insect can be found the hatch used to provide very good fishing.

Isonychia bicolor & sadleriCommon names Leadwing Coachman or Slate Drake. Hook sizes 8 &10. These species are probably only in decent fish-able numbers on less than a handful of stream. They mainly exist in our larger waters. If you find this hatch you can have at times very good fishing. the hatch usually lasts about a week to ten days.

Potamanthus distinctus common names "The White Fly Hatch or Cream Variant" Hook sizes 10 &12. This is another hatch that is restricted to slightly larger and warmer waters if your just trout fishing that is. At times these insects can emerge in abundance that it appears like its snowing. If you find the right waters that have it it can provide great fishing.

There are other mayfly species in our trout waters as well but they are real spotty and may or may not provide reasonable fishing opportunities. At least you now have a list mayfly you can tie flies for or buy if you want to fish "The Hatches"? This should also give you the information you need to do further research regarding WHEN these species hatch and WHERE they hatch.

GOOD LUCK!

ted4887
Posts: 150
Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2011 7:14 pm
Location: Winona, MN

Post by ted4887 » Thu Jun 13, 2013 11:18 am

The Trout Nut site has some outstanding pictures to help you identify bugs as well. He has many of pictures that show each insect in different stages of the lifecycle.


http://www.troutnut.com/

brntrout
Posts: 2945
Joined: Tue Apr 05, 2011 8:26 am

Post by brntrout » Thu Jun 13, 2013 11:40 am

Some great books you can buy to help you better understand trout foods/hatches are: Dave Whitlock's, Guide To Aquatic Trout Foods, Hatches or Hatches II by Caucci/Nastasi, Caddisflies by Gary Lafontaine, Selective Trout by Carl Richards/Doug Swisher, Stoneflies by Carl Richards/Doug Swisher/Fred Arbona Jr and as mentioned already the books written by Ross Mueller which are primary about fishing the "Driftless Area"and what flies are required to be successful. Of course, there are a ton more good books out there but these are IMO some of better ones to start out with.

Post Reply