fishing report Jan 6

General trout, fishing, conservation, or anything outdoors related discussion. Trip reports and stream conditions welcome, but please do not name streams.
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dpnoll
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Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 8:23 am
Location: Lake City

fishing report Jan 6

Post by dpnoll »

Went out yesterday to check out a new stream. I fished from 12-2PM, landed 6 browns and a brook trout. I caught everything on a pink squirrel 2.0. The water was gin clear. Very comfortable fishing. The only mishap was dropping my camera in the water. Luckily it is waterproof, unluckily I had to reach down to my armpit to recover it. Let's just say the water was brisk. Don't know how cold since I can't find my thermometer. Just ordered a new one.

jrs
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Joined: Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:22 am

Re: fishing report Jan 6

Post by jrs »

I fished yesterday as well. Beautiful day for winter fishing. Most of the snow was gone, but ground was still firm making for easy hiking. Air was warm enough for comfort, but not any significant runoff. Nice to have all streams open. I took advantage and visited a stream I haven't been on in months.

I tight line nymph fished with my 10' 2 wt and a bright orange scud trailed by a midge larva. Caught a good number of fish including a bright, 19" brown. Most of the fish, including the 19" brown, took the orange scud. Fish were taking in slower, deeper water as seems to be typical in winter.

brntrout
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Re: fishing report Jan 6

Post by brntrout »

Thanks for the reports guys!

JRS, by chance did you take the stream temperature. I'm guessing it was probably around 38 to 40 degrees. Generally when stream temps are around 38 degrees with no significant hatch taking place the vast majority of trout will be podded up in a very small area in the deepest part of pools.The only time that changes during winter is when a hatch comes off or stream temperature become warmer.

Regarding fishing orange scuds for winter fishing, I have caught literally thousand of trout on orange scuds. For me it is by far the single best producer of any nymph pattern i use. The pattern works well throughout the entire year, and is especially productive during the winter season. Important, The color of your orange scud should to be a light amber orange color WHEN WE. If it turns reddish its a lot less productive IMO. The a few important things to remember. Nymph patterns are useless unless fished where fish are located, and fished deep enough to be in their feeding zone. The last sentence is especially true in winter when trout can be holding very deep and be podded up in just one small area of a pool. Most of the experienced anglers on this board know this information, but there is always some newcomers to flt fishing that don't!.

Hopefully everyone will have a great winter season this year. So far fishing conditions have been good to excellent, lets hope it stays that way!

Cutthroat
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Location: Two Harbors, Minnesota

Re: fishing report Jan 6

Post by Cutthroat »

Do most folks use strike indicators/floats in winter?

jrs
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Joined: Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:22 am

Re: fishing report Jan 6

Post by jrs »

Didn't take stream temp, but based on what I've seen elsewhere recently, would guess it was upper 30s

Scuds have been my best nymph through the years as well. I got away from them a bit in favor of newer flies the last year or two, but need to get back to them. I tie several color variations, but my favorite is straight "Shrimp Pink" Ice Dub with a pink thread. It's brighter than most, but it works for me. I do sometimes wonder whether fish take orange scuds as eggs.

I prefer to tight line nymph when I can. I use a "sighter" (bright mono in my leader), but no floating strike indicator. This works for me as long as casts are relatively short (say 25' or less). A long (10' or more) nymphing rod and a long butt section nymph leader are helpful in getting a longer reach, but not essential. When I need longer casts or drifts, I use a floating indicator. For me it depends on the stream situation, but generally I feel I can get a better deep drift and better strike detection tight lining with a sighter.

Cutthroat
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Location: Two Harbors, Minnesota

Re: fishing report Jan 6

Post by Cutthroat »

Good info. Thanks.

High Stick
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Location: Driftless and The West

Re: fishing report Jan 6

Post by High Stick »

I use a mix of ice dubs and "other" ingredients for my scuds, but mine have a tendency to be on the more orange side with Uni fire orange 6/0 thread for the head. That said, I tie probably four different colors of scuds depending upon water clarity.

Indicator - rarely, but sometimes. I don't Perdigon/Euro tight line, per se, because I still like to cast the fly rod, but I get my flies deep and watch for subtleness of the take.

To each their own.

brntrout
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Joined: Tue Apr 05, 2011 8:26 am

Re: fishing report Jan 6

Post by brntrout »

I almost never use float indicators for a number of reasons. 1.Its impossible to mend line without disturbing the water and spooking fish. 2. Its more difficult to accurately cast into tight windows.with a float indicator attached to your leader. 3.its more effective tight line nymph fishing without an indicator when it comes to detecting strikes and actually hooking fish! 4. IMO most float indicators are to large and create too much slash when landing on the surface of the water, which i'm sure spooks fish, especially the larger more wary trout.

IMO, if you're going to use an indicator make it as small as possible so the problems mentioned above are minimized or eliminated. The other strike indicator option is to use small sections of bright colored tippet material in your leader which will help you detect strikes better without the handicaps of a float indicator.

Not to be critical but IMO using float indicators is a crutch for not learning to detect strikes without using a float indicator. Learning to nymph fish without the use of a float indicator will make you a better angler. The reason is simple, usually if a float indicator moves its because the fish has the hook stuck in its mouth and has pretty much hooked itself. While hooking fish without an indicator means you're sticking fish sooner before the hook becomes lodged in its mouth. That means you're missing less strikes and because of that your catch rate will surely go up!

WhiteGlovedHowdy
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Re: fishing report Jan 6

Post by WhiteGlovedHowdy »

I use bio strike. A half inch, slightly larger than leader width, casts great, adjustable, no splash highly visible.

brntrout
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Joined: Tue Apr 05, 2011 8:26 am

Re: fishing report Jan 6

Post by brntrout »

WhiteGlovedHowdy wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 6:13 pm
I use bio strike. A half inch, slightly larger than leader width, casts great, adjustable, no splash highly visible.
If I do use an indicator I use bio strike as well, and for same reasons Larry points out. Another good reason to use bio strike it can be put on, or taken off fast in case you want to do some dry fly fishing.

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