Fly Line Recommendations

General trout, fishing, conservation, or anything outdoors related discussion. Trip reports and stream conditions welcome, but please do not name streams.
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Postby winonaflyfactory » Tue Mar 13, 2018 2:40 pm

brntrout wrote:Going to a heavier line is kind of defeatist it normally slows the rod down and causes your presentation not to be as delicate.


The purpose of overweighting the rod is to increase the load on the rod without the amount of line needed to achieve the same amount of load. I prefer this because as you noted we rarely need to toss a ton of line in the Driftless area. To me this is the opposite of defeatist, it’s just using the tools of the trade in a different manner.
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Postby brntrout » Tue Mar 13, 2018 2:51 pm

So your saying, if you want to fish a 3 wt., you buy a 2 wt. rod, and put a 3 wt. line on it?

Added: If your having a problem with some of your rods not loading well at closer ranges with the line wt. specified by the manufacture, why don't you just go with a softer/slower action rod. Rods with slower actions usually load much easier than faster action rods. That way you won't have to use a heavier line than suggested by the rod manufacture?
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Postby winonaflyfactory » Tue Mar 13, 2018 4:58 pm

I guess you could do that Tom. I wouldn’t personally because a 2wt rod for me would be more for dry flies and small nymphs. I overweight my 3wt Sage Flight with 4wt line because it works well for me. I can feel it load perfectly and I like it that way. I was simply just giving a different opinion to yours, we differ on much.
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Postby brntrout » Tue Mar 13, 2018 5:21 pm

winonaflyfactory wrote:I guess you could do that Tom. I wouldn’t personally because a 2wt rod for me would be more for dry flies and small nymphs. I overweight my 3wt Sage Flight with 4wt line because it works well for me. I can feel it load perfectly and I like it that way. I was simply just giving a different opinion to yours, we differ on much.


I don't get it, but hey, if it works for you thats all that counts! ;)
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Postby TFO5wt » Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:49 am

wwf is by no means alone in over lining a rod. It's actually quite common out West. Many of the major fly lines are half or a whole weight heavier anyway to load fast action rods. Rio Gold and SA MPX are two examples. Rio Grand is actually a full size heavier. Because of this, I think using the grain weight of a fly line's head is more useful than the weight of the line.
Simply put, people fish because it's fun
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Postby trouts » Wed Mar 14, 2018 5:45 am

I remember laughing and scratching my head when Rio came out with the Grand and I was reading the description. Talk about confusing anglers when they buy a 5wt line to find out it’s really a rebranded 6wt. Problem is many rods are labeled a 5wt and really are a 6wt.

https://www.tridentflyfishing.com/blog/ ... ers-guide/ I think many might find this helpful or at least interesting to read. If you scroll down past the half way point they have a chart of the grain weights for each line at various distances. This is what I wish all fly line companies would list on the back of the package for each particular line. The weight at 10,20, and 30’ along with the total head weight of the line. Generally don’t think much of most industry “shootouts” but they did a good job on this one about lines.
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Postby brntrout » Wed Mar 14, 2018 9:59 am

quote="TFO5wt"]wwf is by no means alone in over lining a rod. It's actually quite common out West. Many of the major fly lines are half or a whole weight heavier anyway to load fast action rods. Rio Gold and SA MPX are two examples. Rio Grand is actually a full size heavier. Because of this, I think using the grain weight of a fly line's head is more useful than the weight of the line.[/quote]

I know some anglers do that, but if you do, your your defeating the purpose of why your fishing a lighter line which is to provide more of a delicate presentation. It also makes the action of a fast action rod act more like a medium action rod. That is kind of telling because it really means the person is better suited to casting medium or slower action rods than faster action rods.

The half weight heavier fly lines have been around for decades. I think the first line designed that way was the Wulff Triangle Taper fly lines. Lee & Joan Wulff taught fly casting classes all over the county. One thing they found common with beginner fly casters and some more experienced casters was they hard time getting their fly ( fast action graphite) rods to load properly with the fly line recommended by the rod manufacture.

One has to remember back then faster action Graphite fly rods were just coming into there own, before that most rods were made of fiberglass or bamboo which are a lot slower in action than even the slowest graphite rods.

To over come the problem the Wulff's came up with the idea for half weight heavier fly lines. IMO many anglers are not suited to casting really fast action rods and would be better off with a slower action rod.

Casting modern fast action fly rods properly requires a lot more "force" to load the rod, and timing between the forward cast and back cast is very fast.If your not using enough force, or your timing is off, the rod will not load properly especially at closer ranges. Bottom line, it takes a lot more effort/work to cast fast action rods compared to slower action rods.

The other thing to keep in mind is a lot of the top of the line fast action rods are designed by professional tournament casters. To do well in tournament casting it requires one to be able cast very fast action rods. The majority of anglers are not professional fly casters.
Last edited by brntrout on Wed Mar 14, 2018 12:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Blackdog1101 » Wed Mar 14, 2018 10:53 am

Wow this turned into quite the discussion. I ended up buying a Cabelas Premium line. Got it on a discount in the Bargain Cave. Cabela’s lines are made by Cortland. I suspect it’s the 444 line just rebranded as Cabelas. For a 3 wt rod and shorter casts I’m sure it will be fine.
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Postby jay92 » Wed Mar 14, 2018 11:10 am

Warren, unless they've changed again, the Cabelas Woodbury fly guy told me that the low end lines, were Cortland and the mid-grade and Premium lines used to be SA, but were switched to RIO. That premium line looks just like the RIO Gold.
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Postby brntrout » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:28 pm

Blackdog1101 wrote:Wow this turned into quite the discussion. I ended up buying a Cabelas Premium line. Got it on a discount in the Bargain Cave. Cabela’s lines are made by Cortland. I suspect it’s the 444 line just rebranded as Cabelas. For a 3 wt rod and shorter casts I’m sure it will be fine.


Warren, seriously, at the distances we normally cast in the Driftless Area 90% of time, the line would have to be really terrible for it not to work OK! Don't get me wrong there is definitely a difference in fly lines and how they perform. At the same time its not as far a part as many believe based on "price" alone.
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