Czech Nymphs

Information and tips for tyers, as well as information on hatches.
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TaG
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Czech Nymphs

Post by TaG » Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:43 pm

Anyone fish these?
My understanding is they are essentially a ultra heavy weighted nymph to fish deep? Would this work tied up in a scud pattern to eliminate the need for extra split shot.?
Thanks

brntrout
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Re: Czech Nymphs

Post by brntrout » Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:04 pm

Yes that could work fine under the right circumstances. The problem arises when you fish shallow rifle areas. If you weight them to fish deep slow pools areas they may be to heavy to fish shallow riffles without immediately hanging up on the bottom.

Unfortunately there is no such thing as weighting flies just one certain amount of weight that allows you to fish all stream depths well. The other problem is if your trying to imitate our natural scuds which run size 12 to 18 approx., there is only so much weight you can add to the fly itself without making them look unnatural in appearance!

You can weight flies enough in some cases to cover most shallow water situations up to a certain depth, after that you will still need to add weight of some kind to the tippet section of your leader if you intend to fish deeper water areas.

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TaG
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Re: Czech Nymphs

Post by TaG » Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:10 pm

Makes sense Tom
Thanks!!
I still struggle when nymphing deeper pools 5-6’ depth.
I know there are fish there but can’t seem to get the hang of depth charge nymphing. 😬

brntrout
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Re: Czech Nymphs

Post by brntrout » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:43 pm

TaG wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:10 pm
I still struggle when nymphing deeper pools 5-6’ depth.
I know there are fish there but can’t seem to get the hang of depth charge nymphing.
Usually it requires a very LONG tippet (5x or 6X) in the 4 to 6 foot range and enough weight to get the fly to the bottom "without the weight being to light or to heavy" If the weight is too much the fly will rocket to the bottom and hang up, if its to light it will take to long for the fly to sink to the bottom. Once your leader /tippet is right and the right amount of weight is figured out, it requires you cast upstream far enough to allow the right amount of time/drift for your fly to get to area you think the trout are holding at. When fishing at that depth floating indicators are worthless. Instead you need to tight line nymph fish in order to detect a strike. That means you have to get your fly to the bottom and have almost zero line slack or you will never detect a strike. If you have to much slack you will never hook the fish before it spits your fly. BOTTOM LINE EVERYTHING IN THE SLIGHTEST THAT LOOKS A STRIKE SHOULD BE CONSIDERED A STRIKE. In other words if anything looks funny where the line/leader enters the water set hook. IF you set the hook and there is no fish there, just go into a back cast and put fly right back in the same spot until you catch fish or need to move on to the next spot. Its a little bit like fishing plastic worms for bass, but with a lot more finesse! ;)

jrs
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Re: Czech Nymphs

Post by jrs » Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:46 am

I've come to appreciate the "euro" style nymphs -- large tungsten beads and slim, hard bodies -- and use them frequently. Typically, I'll pair the euro style "anchor" fly with a smaller, lighter fly -- eg, midge larva in the winter. A 3 or 3.8 mm tungsten bead on a slim euro style nymph gets down enough in most water. In deeper, faster water I'll add weight to the tippet. Perdigon nymphs have been particularly good for me.

I agree with brntrout about the need for a long, light tippet and the preference to tightline rather than suspension / indicator fish.

brntrout
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Re: Czech Nymphs

Post by brntrout » Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:31 am

jrs wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:46 am
Perdigon nymphs have been particularly good for me.
Since I bought a Euro style nymph rod (11'- 2wt.)I started to use Perdigon flies a lot more often. I tie them in a lot of different versions I developed and sizes as well. If you tie them in different hook sizes using different size tungsten beadheads you can tailor them for use in specific stream depths without adding addition weight. Still in the deeper pools you need to add additional weight most of the time, especially if pool depth is over 4 feet and current speed is faster.

In essence that is why the style of tight lining/Euro nymph fishing was developed. IMO fishing deep pools successfully is much easier using the tactics just mentioned!

brntrout
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Re: Czech Nymphs

Post by brntrout » Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:41 am

I might add, during the winter season a lot of the time trout hold in the deeper slower part of pools so in order to catch them learning to fish deep pools is very important if one wants to catch the most trout possible per outing.

brntrout
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Re: Czech Nymphs

Post by brntrout » Mon Jan 28, 2019 12:53 pm

Fishing and tying info for Czech Nymph fishing. Check this out TaG.

https://flytying123.com/tag/czech-nymph/

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TaG
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Re: Czech Nymphs

Post by TaG » Sun Feb 03, 2019 4:07 pm

Thanks Brown Trout!
I will give it a look.

mjewen
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Re: Czech Nymphs

Post by mjewen » Sat Mar 30, 2019 12:15 pm

One other point worth mentioning is Euro-nymphs are typically tied on jig hooks so the point of the hook rides up or at least somewhat up and definitely not down. This results in less snag ups on the bottom. Scuds were mentioned above. I still tie my scuds on standard scud hooks but use a heavier jig hook nymph as my anchor fly and the smaller scud as the dropped off the tag end of a triple surgeon's knot roughly 18-20" above the enchor fly.

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