2018 Fly Swap Recipes

Information and tips for tyers, as well as information on hatches.

Postby Randy » Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:08 pm

2018 Fly Swap participants, please post photos, recipes from this year's fly swap below
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Postby jrs » Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:25 am

A Baetis nymph is one of the most useful flies in SE MN. You can find Baetis hatching from late February into June and again from September through November and you can find Baetis nymphs on the rocks almost anytime time of the year.

There are lots of good Baetis nymphs. I believe that a thin, dark nymph is best for Baetis in our area. Charlie Craven’s Juju Baetis, Andy Roth’s Kinni Nymph, Ross Mueller’s One-Biot Nymph and Tom Dornack’s Simple Killer Baetis are all very good Baetis nymphs and have worked for me. But the Baetis nymph that I still have the most confidence in and experience with is the Skinny Nelson.

I fish this fly as a trailer behind a larger nymph such as an Orange Scud or Pink Squirrel during a large part of the year. I normally tie it without a bead or other extra weight and rely on the heavy lead fly and / or a split shot to get it down. I fish it in traditional nymph fashion – ie, casting up or up and across and dead drifting back. When Baetis are actively emerging a few twitches or a lift once the fly is deep can induce strikes.

It’s a pretty straightforward, standard nymph tie and there are recipes and detailed tying instructions on Charlie’s Fly Box and elsewhere on the web, so let me just give you the recipe for how I tie it. Remember to keep it sparse and thin.
Hook: #18 TMC 3769 (or equivalent)
Thread: black 6/0 or 8/0
Tail: brown speckled hen fibers (or similar)
Abdomen: thread with fine copper wire rib
Wingcase: Lagartun flat mini braid, pearl
Thorax: mix of black synthetic and Peacock Black Ice Dub
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Last edited by jrs on Wed Jan 17, 2018 2:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby teach » Thu Jan 11, 2018 10:28 pm

I am a relatively new tyer (2-3 years) who loves tying flies and some day I will have lots of time to try and perfect all kinds of different patterns, but for now I mostly tie flies that are quick, easily replaceable, and effective. Usually nymphs. The flies I tied for the swap reflect this criteria. They are general attractor patterns without a name to my knowledge - "Wire and Ice" nymph was my witty idea based on the materials. (I first tied the red one as a shortcut to a quicker Higa's S.O.S., and the foundation is just an oversized zebra midge). They are tied with materials that even a novice or occasional tyer should have on hand and basic techniques that a beginner needs to learn right away. Also, these materials are all available in a wide variety of colors that can be mixed and matched to your (or the trout's) preference. You will get a red/peacock version and a pink/black version. Nothing fancy, but I hope they serve you well.

One final note, I tied these on hooks from a fairly new company called "Firehole Outdoors." They are a small business that design, import, and sell only barbless, "competition-style" hooks and sell them at a very reasonable price ($10 for 50 hooks). I'm not going to stand on a barbless soapbox, but I have begun switching many of my new ties over and haven't regretted it. Many of their hooks have a 2x hook gap (including the 633 I used) which I really like.


Wire and Ice Nymph

Hook: Firehole 633, size 14
Bead: Allen Tungsten, 2.8 mm, silver
Thread: UTC 70 denier, black
Tail: 6-8 strands black Krystal Flash
Rib: Medium Ultra Wire in desired color; I used red and pink (smaller sizes work too, I like med. for texture over the thread body)
Thorax: Ice Dub in desired color; I used "peacock" with the red wire and "black peacock" with the pink

Very standard tie: Bead on hook, tie in KF tail (I like to trim each fiber individually to give more natural look), tie in wire, build tapered abdomen with thread, 4-5 rib wraps, bushy ice dub collar, whip finish.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/Kbzt1UbFf5cFDwhW2 (try this link if the photo below cannot be seen)

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Last edited by teach on Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:37 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Postby TFO5wt » Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:46 am

Purple Haze
I was first introduced to this bug on the Upper Clark Fork in 05 or 06. At that point, it hadn't really made its way out of the Bitterroot Valley. I was quite skeptical of a purple dry fly, but it brought fish up top the entire day when nothing in particular was hatching. I've included two sizes, 14 and an 18 (tied on a 16 emerger hook). Both have been solid searching/attracting patterns for me. On certain days, they really get fish looking up. The little guy is also great in spring and again in the fall when baetis are around. The 14 works well for Dark Hendricksons (if you can find them). This is my dry fly of choice most of the time in a dry dropper set-up which I fish quite a bit.

Material/Tying Notes
As mentioned above, I use emerger hooks for smaller flies, in this case Dairiki 125s. The body ends up being the same size a dry fly hook a size smaller, but the wider gap helps on hook up ratio. I've experimented with a bunch of different body materials, and I find Senyo's Laser Dub works the best. It's got a bit of flash, and you can get a very small amount tightly on the thread which is key for tying dries without them getting too bulky. I use EP Fibers for the post. I've got a bunch and they shed water when greased better than other materials. A little saliva helps keep them under control when tying in post. When wrapping hackle around post, I use a small dap of zap a gap on the post. This really helps secure the hackle. I also whip finish on the post under the hackle. The glue helps secure the whip.

Materials
Hooks: Standard Dry and Emerger Hooks (for sizes 16 and under)
Tail: Moose Tail
Body: Senyo's Laser Dubbing
Post: EP Fibers
Hackle: Grizzly

Recipe
Pretty standard parachute dry fly.

1. Tie in tail
2. Tie in post then tie in hackle onto post
3. With a thin bit of dubbing, starting at tail wrap forward, building up the body as you work towards hook eye. Wrap to hook eye, then back to post
4. Apply small bead of zap a gap on post, then wrap hackle down post.
5. Tie off hackle and clip.
6. Whip finish under post

When fishing, I grease only the post then use dust floatant stuff on the hackle and body. I'm not able to see anyone pictures above so I haven't included one. Plenty of pix online of the Purple Haze.
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Postby KhakiSam » Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:17 am

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The Dreamcoat
****I don't claim to invent this at all! I just started tying this up after tying rainbow warriors. Using some of those principles (tinsel underbody) along with basic nymph pattern stuff, I started tying this. It's been a good producer for me, especially on trips to Colorado. One of the things I like most about this is that you can have a lot of color variation with it. Depending on what stretch of holographic tinsel you use, you can get a different gradient of color. So, the recipe below is a general guide, and it's what I used for the bugs I sent out, but the only staple is the holographic tinsel, IMO. That's the technicolor dreamcoat part!

Hook: Umpqua U204 2XL.. sized 16-18
Thread: 6/0 Red
Bead: Gold. whatever fits!
Tail: Pheasant Tail fibers
Wire Ribbing: Copper
Underbody: Veevus holographic tinsel
Thorax: Senyo's laser dub.. scuplin colored . OR . rainbow shad.
Wing: Hungarian Partridge.

Steps:
1. Attach thread and run a solid layer to the back of the hook. (Don't forget bead, like I just did for the instructions) :)
2. Catch in 4-5 pheasant tail fibers for the tail.
3. Attach 4 inches of copper wiring.
4. Attach about 6 inches of holographic tinsel.
5. Run the wire back up to the bead.
6. Begin wrapping the holographic tinsel. If you want it one consistent color, just wrap once, move ahead, and wrap again. If you want more color variation (gradient) in the underbody, you'll have to wrap in one place several times before moving ahead. (Until Yellow turns to green, or blue turns to purple, orange to red, etc.). I've found to get the full spectrum of color you have to wrap it a total of 15 times or so.
7. Wrap thread around tinsel near base of the bead to secure the tinsel wraps. Fold tinsel so it sticks out in front of hook. You'll still need it for later.
8. Counter wrap the wire around tinsel.
9. Wrap thread around wire near base of the base. Twist the wire into a clean break by whirling it around in circular pattern until it breaks.
10. At this point, if you have some Loon Outdoors Thin UV, You could coat the body so it's nice and strong. I believe I did this to the majority of the bugs I sent out.
10. Fold back the tinsel to about 1/4 of the way down the hook. Secure with thread.
11. Apply a pinch of dubbing to the thread for the thorax. Wrap dubbing back to the base of the bead.
12. Take a small feather from hungarian partridge skin (any good soft hackle will do). Gently pull back fibers from the tip of the feather, so it makes a V shape, except for the tip (maybe a 1/8 of an inch left on the tip of the feather?)
13. Cut the tip of the feather. Fold back the feather fibers so you have a nice open V at the end of the feather.
14. Attach this feather as the wing over the thorax. The stem of the feather shouldn't reach past the bead--it should only be the fibers that actually get attached to the fly, not the feather stem, too.
15. Once wing is attached, pull the holographic tinsel back over the thorax, using it to nicely divide the wing. Wrap thread to secure tinsel and whip finish.

Whew! Sorry for being long winded.
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Postby KhakiSam » Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:21 am

Also, in terms of the photo stuff, what I do is copy the image location, then just manually type in the image protocol:
this is step by step what i TYPE... resulting in step three, which will show the image location.
step 1. [img]

step 2. [img] (paste the image location) ***NO paranthesis needed
step 3. [img]put%20the%20image%20location%20here[/img] (For some reason, it's adding weird text between the bracketed IMGs... just because it wants an image address to be there.. but, yeah that's it--just put the image address between those boxes and you got it.

The key in step three is to add the forward slash before img

So, Bret's Wire and Ice nymph:
Last edited by KhakiSam on Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:25 am, edited 4 times in total.
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Postby KhakiSam » Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:21 am

So, Bret's Wire and Ice nymph:

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Love the game of thrones reference.
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Postby winonaflyfactory » Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:25 am

I tied variants on a traditional caddis larva pattern. Simple fly, fun to play with different materials and colors and something we all should have in our boxes IMO.

I tied these flies in a more natural less flashy version.

Hook: An Older Mustad hook they don’t make anymore but I love the curve on. The hook is offset and I’ve never had any problems hooking up and sticking a hookset with it.

2. Copper Wire Rib
3. Olive, Olive brown, green dubbing/ chenille of your choosing.
4. I used scud back on some (remembering how to use my materials again)
5. I threw in partridge soft hackle for some.
6. Black bead, Black dubbing or peacock hurl for the head.

This is a useful pattern for learning (or re-learning) to tie flies. It’s effective and I enjoy playing with the variants.

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Postby Troutchaser » Sun Jan 28, 2018 2:56 pm

I tied up two midges for the swap. The Zelon Musk Midge can be on any size dry fly hook that matches local midges - I used a 22 this time, but the range of 18 to 24 seems to work. Start with a magnifier and good lighting.

1: Black thread: size 14/0 Sheer or size 16/0 Veevus are suggestions. Start thread an eye width back of the eye and wrap back over a jam knot 5 or 6 turns.

2:Take a strand of white Zelon from the hank and form the end into a sideways "J". The bend part of the J will extend out over the eye about a hook shank length (to become the wing) and the long part of the strand will extend beyond the bend to become the tail. Tie down on top of the hook and continue wrapping back towards the bend. Snip off the strand extension to create a tail temporarily about the length of the hook shank.

3: Wind thread forward to the starting point and cross over under the wing and force it upwards with a few thread wraps in front.
(I cheat and use a smidgen of UV glue and UV light to hold the wing upright.) Return thread to just behind the upright wing.

4: Lightly dub the thread with muskrat underfur (no guard hairs) and make a wrap or two behind the wing and a few wraps in front. Tie off and whip finish.

5: Snip the top of the doubled wing Zelon so the height of the wing is about shank length or a bit less - your judgment. Fan it like a comparadun. Snip the tail a bit shorter and you are ready to fish it. Pre-tie on some 6X or 7X tippet is you plan to winter fish with cold hands!

https://photos.google.com/album/AF1QipN ... DJLvSnXZAh
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Postby Troutchaser » Sun Jan 28, 2018 2:57 pm

I tied up two midges for the swap. The Zelon Musk Midge can be on any size dry fly hook that matches local midges - I used a 22 this time, but the range of 18 to 24 seems to work. Start with a magnifier and good lighting.

1: Black thread: size 14/0 Sheer or size 16/0 Veevus are suggestions. Start thread an eye width back of the eye and wrap back over a jam knot 5 or 6 turns.

2:Take a strand of white Zelon from the hank and form the end into a sideways "J". The bend part of the J will extend out over the eye about a hook shank length (to become the wing) and the long part of the strand will extend beyond the bend to become the tail. Tie down on top of the hook and continue wrapping back towards the bend. Snip off the strand extension to create a tail temporarily about the length of the hook shank.

3: Wind thread forward to the starting point and cross over under the wing and force it upwards with a few thread wraps in front.
(I cheat and use a smidgen of UV glue and UV light to hold the wing upright.) Return thread to just behind the upright wing.

4: Lightly dub the thread with muskrat underfur (no guard hairs) and make a wrap or two behind the wing and a few wraps in front. Tie off and whip finish.

5: Snip the top of the doubled wing Zelon so the height of the wing is about shank length or a bit less - your judgment. Fan it like a comparadun. Snip the tail a bit shorter and you are ready to fish it. Pre-tie on some 6X or 7X tippet is you plan to winter fish with cold hands!

https://photos.google.com/album/AF1QipN ... DJLvSnXZAh
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